Britain’s first Muslim peer puts a bounty on Presidents Obama and Bush

Human Events 17 April 2012
By John Hayward

On Monday, the British Labour Party suspended Lord Nazir Ahmed, who hails from the Kashmir region of Pakistan. Ahmed is the first Muslim life peer, having received the title in 1998 from Prime Minister Tony Blair.

The UK Telegraph offers a quick rundown of Ahmed’s career to date:

Lord Ahmed, who was born in Pakistan, became Baron Ahmed of Rotherham at the age of 40. In 2007 he was highly critical of the awarding of a knighthood to Salman Rushdie, claiming the author had "blood on his hands."

In 2009 he was jailed for dangerous driving after sending and receiving text messages minutes before being involved in a fatal motorway crash. The Court of Appeal later suspended his 12-week jail sentence.

He also went ballistic when Dutch member of parliament Geert Wilders, an outspoken critic of Islamic extremism, was invited to screen his movie Fitna in the House of Lords. Ahmed threatened to put 10,000 Muslims on the street to protest the invitation to Wilder. The screening was canceled. Ahmed is nevertheless widely hailed as a "moderate Muslim.”

So what could he possibly do that would be dumber than texting while driving? Well, Lord Ahmed visited his native Pakistan recently, and attended a conference at which he offered a ten-million-pound bounty for the capture of Presidents Barack Obama and George Bush. He didn’t say if that’s ten million pounds apiece, or if you have to bring them in as a set.

Ahmed was responding to the U.S. government’s announcement of a $10 million reward for information leading to the capture of Hafiz Muhammed Saeed, who founded the Lashkar-e-Taiba terrorist organization. They’re the crew that pulled off the Mumbai murder spree in 2008. (...)