Billboard vandalism in British election campaign

Gates of Vienna 11 November 2012
By Baron Bodissey

The websites for British Freedom, the English Defence League, and Kevin Carroll have been under heavy DDOS attack for weeks. The EDL site was hacked by Pakistani Muslims. Kevin Carroll — who is running as the British Freedom candidate for Police and Crime Commissioner in Bedfordshire — has had his campaign billboards in Luton destroyed.

These vicious and unremitting attacks are proof that the EDL and BF are being effective in their efforts. The establishment is unable to present any meaningful counterarguments, so it resorts to underhanded and illegal methods in an attempt to put these brave patriots out of action.

Now it seems that the destruction of Kevin’s campaign billboards may have been ordered officially by the Luton Borough Council. The following press release about the billboard scandal was issued today by British Freedom (and would have appeared here if the BF website were up).

Did Luton Council Take Down PCC Candidate’s Election Billboards?

Within the last week two large (and expensive) billboard posters (see attached) supporting Kevin Carroll’s campaign for election as Bedfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) have been destroyed.

We had expected these very public adverts — both of them in Luton — to be vandalised by our political opponents (who, it seems, cannot see or hear an opposing view without wanting to destroy both medium and messenger), but there was something very odd about the way they had been erased. Instead of the usual random rips and tears, in each case the poster had been neatly and completely stripped away, as if by professional billposters preparing for the next job.

We were baffled by this until yesterday we received information from a trusted insider at Luton Borough Council concerning a special meeting held there shortly after the posters had appeared.

According to our source, the meeting was convened following a public complaint about one of the billboards. It seems the complainant had thought the poster ‘offensive’ and had demanded that it be removed, and the Council was now deciding what action, if any, it should take.

Our source tells us that after a lengthy and very heated discussion, a majority decision was taken to remove both billboard posters for reasons to do with ‘community relations’.

We do not yet know the names of the people who attended the meeting or their levels of seniority. We do not know whether councillors and/ or senior officers were involved, or if the meeting was recorded and minuted.

However, if our source is correct (and he has been completely reliable in the past), then on the face of it this would seem to be a case of official interference in the democratic process, and should be referred to the Electoral Commission.

We are currently seeking further verification and details.

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