Sticks and stones! Push to reform notorious UK ‘insult’ law gains momentum

RT TV 20 November 2012

The British government’s increasingly obstinate stance on criminalizing insults seems to have finally offended the public. Now an official movement, the Reform Section 5 campaign, is drawing support from all levels of society.

Recent headlines have seen a surge in support for the Reform Section 5 campaign.

The arrest of Kyle Little for a "daft little growl” and a "woof” aimed at two Labrador dogs, or the case where an Oxford student was arrested for saying to a policeman: "Excuse me, do you realize your horse is gay?”

Sensational case of "gay horse" was eventually dropped. (Image from www.andrewcusack.com)

In another case, a cafe owner was arrested for displaying biblical passages on a TV screen.

The list of baffling arrests and charges goes on.

TV commentator Ron Liddle told RT there’s a lot of legislation that was introduced without people being aware.

"There’s a whole raft of legislation that stops you saying what you believe in – we don’t have freedom of speech anymore.”

Prominent people have been publicly backing the campaign, which kicked off in earnest in mid-October, including many MPs.

Nigel Farage MEP, leader of the United Kingdom Independent Party, was quoted on Reform Section 5’s website:

"In a robust democracy people must be free to insult and be insulted. We have laws that protect against incitement to violence and hatred, which should be enough. To protect my feelings from those who wish to laugh at me or hold me in contempt is a freedom I never wanted, nor hoped for,” he said. (continue reading...)